Monday, February 8, 2016

It Is Never Too Late To Live Your Dream


Kai Winding, Chuck Mangione, me


Here is the link if you are interested in purchasing this digital book. It can be read on any device.
http://www.amazon.com/Artists-Memoir-Fireworks-Dawn-ebook/dp/B008G371SC/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1454935726&sr=1-1&keywords=Ezshwan+Winding

It is never too late to live your dream. This is the story of how I changed from an older widow, subsisting on food stamps to a recognized artist, living in joy, peace and fellowship. I moved to San Miguel de Allende, Mexico when I was 70 years old and started life all over again.

Fireworks at Dawn takes the reader on a journey of my life, that can appear like a roller coaster; through betrayals and blessings to this delightful last chapter of my life.

Years earlier, I had felt, If I weren’t me, I would be jealous of me! My husband, Kai Winding, was an internationally known jazz trombonist. The rough parts of the relationship were smoothed, and we relished our deep love and soul connection.
Then my life shattered like a crystal goblet thrown against the wall. Kai, who had been in radiant health, developed a severe and increasingly painful headache. He died five months later from a brain tumor.

Fireworks at Dawn is the story of the dramatic changes in my life and thinking that pushed me from a glamorous, colorful and prosperous life through the painful depths of despair and financial ruin to this wonderful last stage of life.
I yearned for a life rich with colorful experiences, where I could live an artistic life, in a place where I could afford to pay for my basic needs; it was up to me. No one was going to rush in and rescue me. I had to make drastic changes.
When I moved to Mexico, I was still in bankruptcy. My art career was stagnant. Leaving my family was the hardest part of the move. My daughters and grandsons mean the world to me, but I had to convince myself that they didn’t need me anymore. Materially, I had little to lose.
A fine water colorist told me several years ago that being a professional artist was equivalent to jumping off a cliff without a parachute. I agreed.
While writing this book, I have had to scrutinize my whole life – the plethora of choices I have made and resultant mistakes and triumphs.
I was encouraged to write my story. Several people told me that they were interested in what made me who I am. “How did you do it? Why are you now content and at peace?” Through the writing of this book, I had the opportunity to question and release my own judgment and self-criticism. If issues from the past still pushed my emotional buttons, it was time to let them go.
I sincerely hope that this account of my life will motivate others who think they are prisoners of circumstances and that their dreams can not be realized.
It is never too late.

A drawing I made when I was 19 years old, in art school